"Welcome to the natural health website for women"
Free e-book
 

Osteoporosis

How to prevent Osteoporosis

In 1993, the Lancet medical journal reported that the remains of an 18th century woman were found beneath a church. Studies showed that these bones were stronger and more dense than the bones of any modern women, either pre-menopausal or post-menopausal. Something in our modern lifestyle is clearly affecting the density and strength of our bones, and only now are we beginning to understand what that might be.

While traditionally considered to be a women’s disease, osteoporosis is also found in men, although normally to a lesser degree. In this section, I’ll examine why women are more likely to get osteoporosis and take a look at why this condition has become so prevalent. Lifestyle is one of the main factors that is within your control, and adopting a few simple changes can go a long way towards protecting the health of your bones.

What is osteoporosis?

The word osteoporosis literally means ‘porous bones’; in other words, bones that are filled with tiny pores, or holes. Our bones change constantly – breaking down and being rebuilt as part of the living process. Two kinds of cells are important for this process, and they are known as osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Osteoclasts renew old bone by dissolving or resorbing it, leaving an empty space. The osteoblasts then fill this empty space with new bone.

If the rate of renewal does not equal the rate of breakdown, bone loss occurs. If this continues over years, the result is osteoporosis. This rate of breakdown can be measured easily with a bone turnover urine test. See tests below.

Are there any symptoms?

Unfortunately, the answer to this question may be no. Osteoporosis is often called a ‘silent disease’ because the first sign of the condition can be a fracture resulting from a minor accident. One patient told me that she discovered she had osteoporosis after breaking her ribs while sneezing. It has even been suggested that the majority of osteoporosis-related accidents are the result of the bone breaking, causing a fall, rather than the reverse.

This one of the reasons why testing – and prevention – are so important.

What is the cause?

There are a number of factors that can contribute to the development of osteoporosis. These include:

  • heredity
  • premature menopause
  • lack of exercise
  • smoking
  • certain medication
  • irregular menstrual cycles
  • weight
  • digestive problems
  • certain foods and drinks

What are your choices?

If you have established osteoporosis there is no doubt that you will need some medical treatment. But don’t write off the natural approach. Follow the recommendations on the following pages alongside your treatment in order to give your body the best chance of increasing bone density.

If you have been told that you do not have osteoporosis and that your bones are normal, or just below (osteopenia), it is worth following the recommendations in order to either maintain that good bone density or to prevent a minor problem from becoming a major one.

Supplements

The first supplement that comes to mind when we consider osteoporosis is calcium. There’s no doubt that calcium is important to build up and maintain the strength of our bones, but high levels in our diets or in supplements do not necessarily mean that the calcium is actually reaching our bones. When we consume calcium we need both stomach acid and vitamin D in order to absorb calcium properly.
 
Many other nutrients are equally crucial for healthy bones, and these include magnesium, vitamin C, zinc and boron. This is why it is important not to focus exclusively on calcium as a supplement for bone health, but to take a range of nutrients that are important for the bones.

Multivitamin and Mineral Supplement

A good quality multivitamin and mineral would form the foundation of your supplement programme to make sure that you are getting a ‘little bit of everything’. You then add in the nutrients listed below in slightly higher amounts which are known to be helpful for osteoporosis.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps to regulate blood levels of both calcium and phosphorus. Without good levels of vitamin D you cannot absorb calcium from your food or your supplements. You may be getting plenty in your diet, but if your body thinks there is not enough in the blood, it will begin to leach it from your bones. Over time this will cause bone loss.

Vitamin D also plays many other important roles including prevention of cancer, especially breast cancer, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. As well as all of these benefits, it is now thought that having good levels of vitamin D can help slow down the ageing process and low levels have been implicated in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and inflammatory bowel disease. To check whether you have sufficient levels of Vitamin D please click Vitamin D Deficiency Test (at home finger prick blood test)

Vitamin C

This vitamin helps with the manufacture of collagen, which is a sort of ‘cement’ that holds the bone matrix (the architecture of the bone) together, so it is as important as the minerals for prevention of osteoporosis. It is important to take a vitamin C in a non-acidic form ascorbate (magnesium ascorbate) rather than ascorbic acid.

B vitamins

High homocysteine levels in menopausal women have also been associated with an increase in bone loss. Homocysteine comes from the breakdown of one of the essential amino acids (methionine) and should, under normal circumstances, be detoxified by the body. Giving women folic acid has helped to reduce the homocysteine in the blood. It has been suggested that a multivitamin and mineral supplement that contains folic acid should be sufficient, and this will also contain vitamin B6, which is important for the bones. Vitamin B6 has also been found to be deficient in people with hip fractures, and rats fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet developed osteoporosis.

Calcium

You do need calcium for your bones but you also need to be able to absorb the calcium you take. Not all calcium supplements are the same. Calcium carbonate is the cheapest form of calcium. It’s literally mined from the ground. This isn’t a naturally occurring form of dietary calcium, as no foods (either plant or animal) that we eat contain calcium carbonate. This is the most difficult form of calcium to absorb and you need a pretty efficient digestive system in order to manage it. If you have low levels of stomach acid (hydrochloric acid), you will struggle to absorb the calcium from a calcium carbonate supplement.

One study showed that of a group of post-menopausal women, 40 percent were severely deficient in stomach acid. Those with the low levels only absorbed 4 percent of the calcium from calcium carbonate, as compared to 45 percent of the calcium from another form of calcium supplement, called calcium citrate. In another study, 500mg of calcium citrate was absorbed better than even 2000mg of calcium carbonate.

Blood-testing for calcium levels is not particularly helpful because your body has a fail-safe mechanism to take calcium from your bones if the level falls in the blood. In other words, your calcium levels might appear high even when they are not, because your body will have leached calcium from your bones. A hair mineral analysis is a better indicator because you can see high calcium turnover (the calcium level is higher than normal) in the results.

Magnesium

Magnesium is just as important as calcium for your bones. It helps in metabolising calcium and vitamin C and helps to convert vitamin D to the active form necessary to ensure that calcium is efficiently absorbed by your body.

Not having enough magnesium can stop bone growth, decrease bone cell activity and make the bones more fragile. Magnesium also prevents the build-up of unwanted calcium deposits elsewhere in the body.

Boron

Boron is another mineral that is being widely studied in relation to osteoporosis. Research conducted by the US Department of Agriculture demonstrated that giving post-menopausal women boron supplements daily resulted in a 44 percent reduction in the amount of calcium excreted in their urine. The conclusions of this study were that boron improved the metabolism (the way it is used by the body) of both calcium and magnesium. Boron is found in alfalfa, kelp, cabbage and leafy greens.

Zinc

Zinc helps vitamin D absorb calcium. Zinc is needed for the proper formation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, the two cells which are essential for bone remodelling. Zinc has found to be deficient in older people with osteoporosis

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Having good levels of Omega 3 fatty acids can have a beneficial effect on calcium absorption and bone density. These fatty acids increase the absorption of calcium from the digestive system and reduce the excretion of calcium in urine. They can slow the loss of bone that happens around the menopause and it has been found that a diet which contains adequate amounts of calcium but not of essential fatty acids can increase the risk of osteoporosis.

Essential fatty acids (EFA’s) ‘oil’ the body by lubricating the joints, skin and vagina as well as being a vital component of every human cell. The body needs them to balance hormones, insulate nerve cells, make the skin and arteries supple and to keep the body warm. If a deficiency in EFAs is not corrected, the problems can become more serious and can include heart disease, cancer, arthritis and depression.

Signs of an Omega 3 fatty acid are dry skin, lifeless hair, cracked nails, fatigue, depression, dry eyes, lack of motivation, aching joints, difficulty in losing weight, forgetfulness, breast pain -. If you have also tried to lose weight by going on a low-fat or no-fat diet, you are likely to be deficient in these essential fats. It is now estimated that we are getting ten times more Omega 6 fats from our diet than Omega 3 and over the last century there has been an 80% decrease in the consumption of these Omega 3 fatty acids. When you eat Omega 3 fats they are converted to substances that have an anti-inflammatory effect on the body.

Many of the women I see in the clinic have been taking evening primrose oil supplements – an Omega 6 fatty acid – for years and have not been eating enough Omega 3 oils, or taking them in supplement form, to counterbalance this. Some women are also taking combinations such as Omega 3, 6, and 9 in supplement form because they have heard that we need a good balance of all the Omega fatty acids. This is true, but you have to take into account what your own levels may be in the first place. It is no good adding in more Omega 6 if you have already got enough or in fact too much in your body. (You can now have a blood test to tell you if you have the correct levels of Omega 3 to Omega 6 in your body see below). To check whether you have sufficient levels of Omega 3 please click Omega 3 Deficiency Test (finger prick blood)

Furthermore, by adopting a healthier lifestyle you will be more likely to prevent osteoporosis which is discussed in detail in the rest of this ebook which you can read by clicking on Understanding Osteoporosis ebook at The Natural Health Practice

Tests

There are a number of tests available that are extremely useful and are well worth considering. These tests can give you invaluable insights into understanding what is going on in your body at the moment and can tell you what vitamin and mineral deficiencies and heavy toxic metal excesses you may have. They can let you know what your general condition is and how well your digestive system is functioning and then explain what action you need to take to rectify any imbalances the results may reveal. The analysis of these results lets you know what supplements you need to take in order to bring your body back into balance and into optimum health. This is also designed to help prevent these problems from recurring in the future.

Mineral Deficiency Test with Supplement Programme (hair)
Find out what the mineral and heavy toxic levels are in your body

This test measures the deficiencies and excess levels of 12 different minerals (including calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium and zinc) and 6 heavy toxic metals (including aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and nickel) that may be present in your body. Find out more – Mineral Deficiency Test with Supplement Programme (hair)

Online Personalised Supplement Assessment Programme
Discover what vitamins and minerals you need and should be taking

The analysis of this comprehensive questionnaire will give you a three monthly supplement programme to help balance any vitamin and mineral deficiencies you may have. Find out more – Online Personalised Supplement Assessment Programme

Osteoporosis Bone Turnover Test (Urine)
Find out how healthy your bones are

This simple urine test, (which is collected at home), measures how much your bone is turning over. i.e. The rate at which you might be loosing bone.

After three months you would then have a re-test in order to monitor your progress and adjust your supplement programme according to your new condition. Find out more – Osteoporosis Bone Turnover Test (Urine)

Vitamin D Deficiency Test (at home finger prick blood test)
With all the news in the press about the benefits of having good levels of vitamin D e.g. prevention of cancer, especially breast cancer, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis it is important that you know whether or not you are lacking in this vital vitamin.

We know that Vitamin D is required for calcium absorption, but it also plays many other important roles including prevention of cancer, especially breast cancer, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. As well as all of these benefits, it is now thought that having good levels of vitamin D can help slow down the ageing process and low levels have been implicated in other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and inflammatory bowel disease. To check whether you have sufficient levels of Vitamin D please click Vitamin D Deficiency Test (at home finger prick blood test)

Omega 3 Deficiency Test (finger prick blood)
If you want to find out if you are getting enough Omega 3 fatty acids from your diet and whether you have the correct balance of essential fatty acids.

Signs of an Omega 3 fatty acid are dry skin, lifeless hair, cracked nails, fatigue, depression, dry eyes, lack of motivation, aching joints, difficulty in losing weight, forgetfulness, breast pain. If you have also tried to lose weight by going on a low-fat or no-fat diet, you are likely to be deficient in these essential fats. It is now estimated that we are getting ten times more Omega 6 fats from our diet than Omega 3 and over the last century there has been an 80% decrease in the consumption of these Omega 3 fatty acids. When you eat Omega 3 fats they are converted to substances that have an anti-inflammatory effect on the body.

Many of the women I see in the clinic have been taking evening primrose oil supplements – an Omega 6 fatty acid – for many years as it can be helpful with PMS. But you can end up with too much Omega 6 and not enough Omega 3 in your body. Some women are also taking combinations such as Omega 3, 6, and 9 in supplement form because they have heard that we need a good balance of all the Omega fatty acids. This is true, but you have to take into account what your own levels may be in the first place. It is no good adding in more Omega 6 if you have already got enough or in fact too much in your body. (You can now have a blood test to tell you if you have the correct levels of Omega 3 to Omega 6 in your body see below). To check whether you have sufficient levels of Omega 3 please click Omega 3 Deficiency Test (finger prick blood)

After three months you would then have a re-test in order to monitor your progress and adjust your supplement programme according to your new condition.

If you need help in obtaining any of the supplements, herbs or tests mentioned above, click, osteoporosis options at The Natural Health Practice. They can supply all of them for you online or if you prefer to talk to somebody first you can also order by mail order on the telephone. The products supplied by this company are always of the highest quality.

Plan of Action

Nutrition

Ensure you are getting the right nutrition.Follow the dietary recommendations outlined in the free The Foundation of Health ebook For more information on the special dietary recommendations for osteoporosis, read the rest of the ebook on Understanding Osteoporosis ebook at The Natural Health Practice

Supplements

The supplement programme below should be taken for at least three months in order to achieve best results

Nutrients & amounts

A good multi-vitamin & mineral supplement   Magnesium citrate 1150mg (185mg elemental)
Vitamin B 25mg Omega 3 fish oils (providing 770mg EPA and 510mg DHA)
Vitamin D 600ius Zinc 30mg
Calcium Citrate 1150mg (262mg elemental) Boron 1mg
Vitamin C 1000mg    

To avoid having to purchase numerous supplements for all of the above and to make the process easier, I have put together a supplement programme which contains all the nutrients and herbs mentioned above and in the correct dosages. For more information about these click Osteoporosis Supplement Programme

In my book ‘Osteoporosis – how to Treat, Prevent and Reverse it’ I explain the impact of nutrition on bone health and include information that is invaluable for anyone diagnosed with osteoporosis or wants to prevent it.

If you would like to order these special supplements now, you can do so through the Natural Health Practice by clicking Osteoperosis Supplements at the Natural Health Practice.

At the end of three months you should reassess your condition and adjust your supplement programme accordingly.

Tests

The tests below have been specially selected to be the most helpful if you are concerned about osteoporosis.

Mineral Deficiency Test with Supplement Programme (hair)

Online Personalised Supplement Assessment Programme

Osteoporosis Bone Turnover Test (Urine)

Vitamin D Deficiency Test (at home finger prick blood test)

Omega 3 Deficiency Test (finger prick blood)

After three months you would then have a re-test in order to monitor your progress and adjust your supplement programme according to your new condition.

If you need help in obtaining any of the supplements, herbs or tests mentioned above, click, Osteoporosis options at The Natural Health Practice. They can supply all of them for you online or if you prefer to talk to somebody first you can also order by mail order on the telephone. The products supplied by this company are always of the highest quality.

Read More

Understanding Osteoporosis Ebook
This section forms part of a larger complete e-book on Osteoporosis.
 
In the rest of the e-book you will learn what the medical approaches to Osteoporosis are and how to combine them with the natural approach. This is called Integrated Medicine and is the way that healthcare of the future is moving towards. You will also learn what medical tests will give you an accurate diagnosis of your condition and if you really need to have them. The medical treatments for Osteoporosis are then examined which can include looking at either drugs or surgery. Each treatment is then discussed and the pros and cons of the options explained. The Integrated Approach to Osteoporosis is considered in some detail so that if appropriate you can know how to combine the best of both conventional and natural medicine.

At the end of the e-book is a practical step by step summary of what you can do to help yourself.

If you would like to read the rest of this ebook click, Understanding Osteoporosis ebook at The Natural Health Practice and you will be given details of how you can download the whole e-book.

Osteoporosis - How to Prevent, treat, and reverse it Book
Or if you would like even more in depth advice about Osteoporosis you should read “Osteoporosis – how to prevent, treat and reverse it” – an international best seller acclaimed by many as “one of the best books I have ever read on Osteoporosis.”

Disclaimer

The contents of this site are for information only and are intended to assist readers in identifying symptoms and conditions they may be experiencing. This site is not intended to be a substitute for taking proper medical advice and should not be relied upon in this way. Always consult a qualified doctor or health practitioner, especially if you are pregnant, taking the pill or on any medication. Your situation will need to be looked at individually and you should not attempt to self treat. The author and publisher cannot accept responsibility for illness arising out of the failure to seek medical advice from a doctor.

The views expressed by third parties placing material on these pages are not representative of the views of the author or publisher. The Author and Publisher cannot monitor the content not produced by us and has not reviewed all the third party material published on this site and the Author and Publisher accept no liability whatsoever in relation to the content of third party material placed on these pages.

 
Print Friendly